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Previous issues of the newsletter are published below.

  • Nikolina Šarčević

Name: Federico Urban


Current position: Postdoc

Affiliation: CEICO, FZU Institute of Physics, Prague





What is your field of research?

Cosmology, high-energy astroparticle physics.


What is your career trajectory to date?

I've completed my PhD in the University of Ferrara, Italy, and I have ever since moved on to postdoc positions at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada; Université Libre de Bruxelles in Brussels, Belgium; KBFI, Tallinn, Estonia. In between I spent one year as a visiting researcher at the Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics in Oslo, Norway.


What are the most exciting open questions in your research area?

Where do UHECR come from? Where do astrophysical neutrinos come from? What is dark matter? What is the correct theory of Gravity?


What do you like and dislike about being a scientist?

Like: the continuous challenges and changes, the perpetual learning, the internationality. Dislike: the volatility and unpredictability of the career path and opportunities.


Which of your skills are you most proud of, or find most useful?

Versatility, initiative, team coordination; and clarity/pedagogic skills when giving talks.


In your career so far, at what point were you the most excited, and what were you excited about?

The detection of the GW170817 event in 2017, and the coming to life of the global multimessenger network.


What advances or new results are you excited about or looking forward to?

The rotation measure data of the SKA, that will hopefully help us precisely map the Galactic extra-Galactic magnetic fields.


What role do you think a community network like EuCAPT can play in developing theoretical astroparticle physics and cosmology in Europe?

To remove barriers between researchers, in such a way that everyone would be able to reach out to a colleague who might be able to collaborate or advise on a task or project, especially when the goal is multidisciplinary.


Have you lived in a different European country than you do now? If so, would you like to tell us something about it, e.g. a fond memory or something you found surprising?

The sauna mid-winter gatherings in Estonia, the endless summer daylight in Norway, the microbrewery festivals in small towns in Belgium, and the neverending food discussions in Italy.


How do you like to relax after a hard day of work?

I hit the road with my bicycle or walk along the river reading a book.


Do you have any non-physics interests that you would like to share?

Trekking, extreme metal music.


What do you hope to see accomplished scientifically in the next 50 years?

Finally understand Gravity beyond General Relativity, and pinning down the mechanism(s) that generate UHECRs and neutrinos.


What do you wish someone had told you when you were still a student? Academic life can be unforgiving: it's very important that you enjoy your research and your project, so choose carefully and stand by your choices.



Name: Juan García-Bellido


Current position: Professor


Affiliation: Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid




What is your field of research?

Cosmology at large, both early and late universe, both theoretical and observational.


What is your career trajectory to date?

PhD UAM Madrid 1992, PDRA Stanford 1993-95, CERN TH Fellow 1996-98, Imperial College URF RS 1998-99, Professor UAM 1999, Visiting Prof UniGE 2009-10.


What are the most exciting open questions in your research area?

Nature of Dark Matter and Dark Energy.


What do you like about being a scientist?

I love the intellectual challenges of research on unexplored territory.


Which of your skills are you most proud of, or find most useful?

A broad cosmic vision of the Universe.


In your career so far, at what point were you the most excited, and what were you excited about?

Nowadays on the existence of primordial black holes as the main component of dark matter.


What new skills would you like to learn in the next year?

First hand knowledge inside Virgo of the subsolar mass range of black holes.


What advances or new results are you excited about or looking forward to?

Increased sensitivity of LVK and LSST to detect sub solar mass black holes.


What is the biggest obstacle that is slowing down your research field right now?

Lack of man/woman power.


What role do you think a community network like EuCAPT can play in developing theoretical astroparticle physics and cosmology in Europe?

A fundamental one, in coordinating efforts towards Einstein Telescope.


What’s your favorite food?

Boletus Edulis.


How do you like to relax after a hard day of work?

By oil painting.


If you were not a scientist, what do you think you would be doing?

Painter.


What do you hope to see accomplished scientifically in the next 50 years?

Detection of the B-mode polarization from inflation and the nature of dark energy.


Do you have a family and how do you reconcile both research and family?

By carefully organizing my time, giving both their share.





Name: Irene Tamborra


Current position: Professor


Affiliation: Niels Bohr Institute, Copenhagen


What's your field of research?

Theoretical particle astrophysics. I like to explore the role of weakly interacting particles in astrophysics and cosmology. Within a multi-messenger framework, I also work to unveil what can be learnt by adopting neutrinos as probes of extreme astrophysical sites.


What is your career trajectory to date?

I completed my undergraduate and graduate studies at the University of Bari (Italy) in 2011. I then spent two years at the Max Planck Institute for Physics in Munich (Germany) as Alexander von Humboldt Fellow, before joining the GRAPPA Institute, University of Amsterdam (Netherlands) for another couple of years. In 2016, I was hired as Knud Højgaard Assistant Professor at Niels Bohr Institute, Copenhagen (Denmark) and was promoted Associate Professor in 2017. I am Full Professor since the beginning of 2021.


What are the most exciting open questions in your research area?

The advent of multi-messenger astronomy is offering unprecedented opportunities to learn about the unknowns of the universe, this is extremely exciting. My favorite messenger is the neutrino, its physics in the context of astrophysical sources is still poorly understood. With the upcoming large-scale neutrino telescopes, the growing multi-messenger datasets, and progress on the theoretical front, I hope we will be able to address these questions.


In your career so far, at what point were you the most excited, and what were you excited about?

I really enjoy the excitement that comes when I finally man a riddle that has kept me busy for long time and everything falls into place, I am lucky enough to have experienced this feeling in many instances. An extreme example is when I discovered the LESA instability; it was such a counter-intuitive and unexpected phenomenon that I thought I had a bug in my code, but I could not find it and I worked on it extremely hard and for a very long time. It has been very rewarding to confirm and understand my findings. In addition to scientific discoveries, I am really thrilled to see students grow into junior scientists. What is the biggest obstacle that is slowing down your research field right now? Neutrinos require a lot of patience. As for the high-energy tail of the neutrino spectrum, we do not understand which are the sources of the neutrino events observed from the IceCube Observatory; we should probably gather a larger number of events to gain better insights on the origin of these neutrinos and the conditions under which neutrinos are produced. In addition, we have not detected ultra high energy neutrinos yet. At lower energies, neutrinos play a crucial role in the physics of some of the most extreme events in the universe, such as core-collapse supernovae and neutron star mergers, as well as in the early universe; however, we do not really grasp neutrino mixing at such high densities--this is a very hard problem, but progress is being made. These issues also have implications on the possibility of discovering physics beyond the Standard Model through astrophysical sources and on our understanding of the source physics.


If you were not a scientist, what do you think you would be doing? I would be an artist or a professional gymnast. What do you hope to see accomplished scientifically in the next 50 years?

I am eagerly awaiting for the next nearby supernova explosion, of course!